Excercise &diet: biomarkers &mechanisms in humans

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Project Title: Excercise &diet: biomarkers &mechanisms in humans
Project Number: 5U54CA116847-05-0004
Project web address: Follow on NIH
Parent Project: 5U54CA116847-05
 
Project Description:
Physical activity and nutrition alter cancer risk with possible mechanisms including effects on inflammation, insulin-like growth factors, insulin resistance, steroid hormones and lipid metabolism. A yet unexplored possible mechanism linking energy balance to cancer risk includes effects on DNA repair capacity. Defects in DNA repair function are clearly carcinogenic and intriguing preliminary evidence suggests that regular exercise results in an adaptive response of enhanced antioxidant defenses and DNA repair. DNA repair capacity also plays a central role in that inflammatory process can increase oxidative DNA damage. The proposed Project 4 of the Seattle TREC will address the intersection of diet, physical activity, weight, and body composition on biomarkers of cancer risk. The research will be ancillary to a funded human clinical trial of exercise and caloric restriction. Primary specific aims are to investigate the separate and combined effects of 1-year of exercise and/or a reduced-calorie diet among 503 postmenopausal women on 1) biomarkers of inflamation (C-reactive protien, serum amyloid A, interleukin-6), 2) DNA damage sensitivity and DNA repair capacity, and 3) plasma protien patterns (proteomics) Investigations of intervention effects on plasma protien patterns will enable us to identify possible new mechanisms linking exercise or a reducedcalorie diet to carcinogenesis. As secondary outcomes we will evaluate intervention effects on gene expression of DNA repair genes and on biomarkers of obesity. Further, we will investigate whether intervention effects differ by body mass index or body composition prior to the intervention or or dependent on changes in body composition during the course of interventions. Finally, we will explore wether genetic characteristics modify the intervention effects. The proposed measurements will be complemented by biomarkers already planned within the funded parent grant (Insulin, IGF1, IGFBP3, steroid hormones) and allow for investigations of interactions with the newly investigated pathways. Thus, Project 4 provides a comprehensive and cost-effective approach for investigating the independent and combined effects of exercise and caloric restriction on biomarkers of cancer risk among humans. Close collaborations with Projects 2, 3, and 5 will enhance our understanding of the mechanistic effects linking exercise and energy balance to cancer risk.
 
Project Terms:
address adipocytes adipokines adiponectin affect androgens animal model animals anti-inflammatory anti-inflammatory agents antioxidants base biological markers body composition body fat body mass index body weight body weight decreased breast c-reactive protein caloric restriction cancer prevention cancer risk cancer type carcinogenesis characteristics clinical trials collaborations colon carcinoma colorectal comet assay complement cost cytokine defect density development diet diet and cancer diet and exercise dna dna damage dna repair dna repair enzymes dna repair gene energy balance energy metabolism estrogens exercise funding future gene expression gene therapy genetic genetic polymorphism glucose goals haplotypes human human study igf1 gene igfbp3 gene inflammation inflammatory inflammatory marker insulin insulin resistance insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 insulin-like growth factor i interleukin-6 intervention intervention effect investigation leptin link lipid metabolism malignant neoplasms mammography measurement measures mediating modeling mutagens new technology nutrition obesity overweight oxidative dna damage parent grant pathway interactions pattern pharmaceutical preparations physical activity plasma plasma proteins play population population study postmenopause pre-clinical preventive process programs protein c protein structure proteomics ptgs2 gene randomized controlled trials research research study resources response risk role secondary outcome serum serum amyloid a protein somatomedins specimen steroid hormone t-cell receptor-rearrangement excision dna circles testing up-regulation (physiology) weight woman xrcc1 gene breast cancer prevention aging cancer genetics
Project Title: Excercise &diet: biomarkers &mechanisms in humans
Project Number: 5U54CA116847-05-0004
Project web address: Follow on NIH
Parent Project: 5U54CA116847-05
Organization: Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, United States, Washington, SEATTLE
Principal Investigators (PI): Ulrich Cornelia M, US
 
Project Categories:
Natural Sciences
 
Other Information:
Fiscal Year: 2009
Project Start Date: 1 September 2009
Project End Date: 31 August 2010
Project program: Specialized Center--Cooperative Agreements
 
Project Funding Information:
Funding Mechanism: Research Centers
Year Funding Organization Total Funding, $
2009 NIH - National Cancer Institute $141,739
Project Title: Excercise &diet: biomarkers &mechanisms in humans
Project Number: 5U54CA116847-05-0004
Project web address: Follow on NIH
Parent Project: 5U54CA116847-05
 
Title FY Funding
There are no results for this project in database.
Project Title: Excercise &diet: biomarkers &mechanisms in humans
Project Number: 5U54CA116847-05-0004
Project web address: Follow on NIH
Parent Project: 5U54CA116847-05
 
Project Title Organization FY Funding
Project Title: Excercise &diet: biomarkers &mechanisms in humans
Project Number: 5U54CA116847-05-0004
Project web address: Follow on NIH
Parent Project: 5U54CA116847-05
 
Title Journal Year Country Rel
Project Title: Excercise &diet: biomarkers &mechanisms in humans
Project Number: 5U54CA116847-05-0004
Project web address: Follow on NIH
Parent Project: 5U54CA116847-05
 
Title Year
Project Title: Excercise &diet: biomarkers &mechanisms in humans
Project Number: 5U54CA116847-05-0004
Project web address: Follow on NIH
Parent Project: 5U54CA116847-05
 
Title Phase Year